History

With Their Bare Hands: General Pershing, the 79th Division, and the battle for Montfaucon

After the American declaration of war on Germany in 1917, hundreds of thousands of U.S. troops were deployed to France–among them the recently drafted Seventy-Ninth Division. Thrown into the hellish stalemate of trench warfare, the (AEF) was blooded in battle by the time of the Meuse-Argonne offensive of 1918 where the Seventy-Ninth would fight its

The Words We Live By

THE WORDS WE LIVE BY takes an entertaining and informative look at America’s most important historical document, now with discussions on new rulings on hot button issues such as immigration, gay marriage, gun control, and affirmative action.

In THE WORDS WE LIVE BY, Linda Monk probes the idea that the Constitution may seem to offer

Unlikely Warrior: A Jewish Soldier in Hitler’s Army

As a young adult in wartime Vienna, Georg Rauch helped his mother hide dozens of Jews from the Gestapo behind false walls in their top-floor apartment and arrange for their safe transport out of the country. His family was among the few who worked underground to resist Nazi rule. Then came the day he was drafted into Hitler’s army

Revolutionary

A fascinating retelling of the story of America’s first female soldier, Deborah Sampson Gannett, who ran away from home in 1782, successfully disguised herself as a man, and fought valiantly in the Revolutionary War.

At a time when rigid societal norms seemed absolute, Deborah Sampson risked everything and defied all odds in search of something

The African Americans

The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross is the companion book to the six-part, six hour documentary of the same name, airing on national, primetime public television in the fall of 2013. The series is the first to air since 1968 that chronicles the full sweep of 500 years of African American history, from the origins…

The Nation’s Stage: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

When the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts opened in our nation’s capital on September 8, 1971, its mission was to be the “national center for the performing arts.” Forty years later the Center has succeeded in that mission and continues to celebrate it—countless times over—in every state and country around the world,